Losers: Declining and Uncertain Populations

I have been busy re-tagging all my images since it turned out that Cornell’s All About Birds site was not up-to-date on its populations trends. I realized this when I began noticing differences in their information compared with Partners in Flight. Cornell told me to rely on Partners in Flight and that they would have their site updated in January. You may have noticed also that I updated my earlier Winners page in accord with my updated tags.

Birds whose populations are declining include: American Kestrel, Baltimore Oriole, Barn Swallow, Blue Jay, Brown Thrasher, Brown-headed Cowbird, European Starlings, House Sparrow, Indigo Bunting, Little Blue Heron, Long-tailed Duck, Mallard, Northern Flicker, Northern Harrier, Northern Mockingbird, Northern Shoveler, Oak Titmouse, Red-winged Blackbird, Short-eared Owl, Song Sparrow, Western Meadowlark, and Wood Stork.

Species whose populations are uncertain are: Downy Woodpecker, Green Heron, and White-throated Sparrow. Declining and uncertain populations are not necessarily a sign that the species is threatened with extinction, since several of these species have very large populations to begin with.  Nevertheless, they bear watching.

Author: Stephen Fielding Images

I'm a retired medical sociologist from the University of Rochester. My publishing experience includes a wide variety of academic articles and a book, "The Practice of Uncertainty" (1999). The mission of my blog is to provide accounts of the natural environment, including photos, in order to raise awareness of its fragility and the impact of climate change. Climate change is the greatest challenge currently faced by humanity. I occasionally write about the impact of climate change using the principles of social scientific writing. To do this I read reputable books and articles on the topic. So when I make statements about climate change you will see a link taking you to the scientific source(s) of the information I provide. As for my independently published photobooks, each has gone through several layers of editing and peer review for both readability and accuracy. This is not to say that everything I say is accurate. Even the New York Times makes mistakes. So, if you find something that is factually incorrect, let me know. I hope you find reading my blog a positive experience. If you do, please encourage your family and friends to have a look. Best wishes, -Steve

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