The Natural Environment and Social Issues

Some folks have asked how I came to be interested in birds and nature given that I live in an urban setting and my professional background is in labor studies, public health, and things like medical malpractice claims.

But it was not always like this. Having grown up in farm country, I was mostly outdoors in fields and woods.  The nearest paved road from our house was about a half mile away.  So I guess you could say that the camera gives me an incentive to go back out into the fields and woods.

Still, there is another reason, connected to my professional work. As well-publicized by Al Gore and many scientists, the natural environment is powerfully driven by geological and climatic influences.  However, it also driven by us, as I discuss on a separate page in this blog. At first our environmental impact was slight; however, over the course of the twentieth century our impact grew exponentially. Though our effects are not as influential as geology and climate, the data show that our influence on climate is contributing to the warming of the planet.

So as I photograph the birds and landscapes, I’m providing a sociological glimpse into what humanity is doing, and dare I say, having a lot of fun doing it.

Author: Stephen Fielding Images

I'm a retired medical sociologist from the University of Rochester. My publishing experience includes a wide variety of academic articles and a book, "The Practice of Uncertainty" (1999). The mission of my blog is to provide accounts of the natural environment, including photos, in order to raise awareness of its fragility and the impact of climate change. Climate change is the greatest challenge currently faced by humanity. I occasionally write about the impact of climate change using the principles of social scientific writing. To do this I read reputable books and articles on the topic. So when I make statements about climate change you will see a link taking you to the scientific source(s) of the information I provide. As for my independently published photobooks, each has gone through several layers of editing and peer review for both readability and accuracy. This is not to say that everything I say is accurate. Even the New York Times makes mistakes. So, if you find something that is factually incorrect, let me know. I hope you find reading my blog a positive experience. If you do, please encourage your family and friends to have a look. Best wishes, -Steve

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