Mid-day in Rochester

I am stretching things a bit because today’s post does not focus on the natural environment, rather one that is human-made. According to the “rules,” the harsh light of mid-day is the worst time to photograph. However, today’s unsettled weather found the sky filled with clouds moving at  a good clip so I got my “Big Stopper” filter and went out to photograph Rochester’s iconic bridge, the Douglass-Anthony Memorial.

My camera set to ISO 100, lens @ 29mm, f/22 @ 30 secs., here it is:

Frederick Douglass–Susan B. Anthony Memorial Bridge

 

A Night in the Woods

Winter is not the most popular time to photograph. Not only is it cold but everything is so drab. However, winter is a great time for us black and white photographers. So, I donned my winter gear and spent some time in the woods in late February looking for some good tree compositions to photograph after dark. My idea was to use my flash to highlight a particularly interesting tree so it would stand out against a relatively dark background, much as you might do in a studio with a black, felt background cloth.

Once finding the compositions, the trick was finding the same shooting spot after dark. Accomplishing that, I set my camera on a tripod; then using Kodak Tri-X 400 film I set my lens to f/2 and the shutter to bulb. While handholding my Speedlite flash off-center from my camera, I opened the shutter just long enough to manually trigger the flash. I took three shots of each composition at 1/1, 1/4, and 1/8 power. Twenty-seven frames later, here are the best (click to enlarge).