Bufflehead Duck, In the early 20th century shooting had reduced Bufflehead population numbers significantly, but between 1955 and 1992 surveys indicate that numbers more than doubled, despite large year-to-year fluctuations.

Unlike Mallards, these birds are more wary of humans, so don’t expect to get too close. According to Cornell’s All About Birds http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/bufflehead/lifehistory/ac#at_consv :

  • The Bufflehead nests almost exclusively in holes excavated by Northern Flickers and, on occasion, by Pileated Woodpeckers.
  • Unlike most ducks, the Bufflehead is mostly monogamous, often remaining with the same mate for several years.
  • The Bufflehead lays eggs more slowly than most other ducks, commonly with intervals of two or three days between eggs.

The takeoff sequence was shot at Braddock Bay, which is a major stop-over on the eastern inland migration flyway. It is located on the south shore of Lake Ontario. Upon reaching this area, most birds will continue northward by circling the Ontario shoreline in an easterly or westerly direction since there are few updrafts over the lake, resulting in the expenditure of more energy.

1/500@f/11, ISO 250, EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM +1.4x III, 560 mm, Canon EOS 60D

 

On which paper to print

Until now, I’ve been using Epson papers. These include their Ultra Premium Matte, Premium Semi-Gloss, and Ultra Premium Luster. The Matte finish seems to be good for high quality black and whites, while the Luster provides good detail and color rendition for bird photographs. The slightly rough surface does not show fingerprints. The Semi-Gloss is a mid-range paper at somewhat lower cost. Overall, I can say that I’m generally satisfied with all.

Still, there are so many other papers and surfaces out there worth trying. I went to one of our few remaining local photo stores and asked them about different papers and their quality.  He said that once you focus on the quality papers, the best one to use is based on how it will be presented (e.g., framed under glass or exposed and more prone to handling, etc.) and what kind of aesthetic look you want.

Okay, so this information was good to know, but I still could not decide with which paper to experiment. Well what do you know?  Several vendors have variety packs; the salesman suggested I try MOAB, by Legion Paper. It contains 13 pairs of stock including rags, fiber, velvet, canvass, and metallic — all for $16 in 8.5 X 11. I’ll let you know what I think as I print with this stock

Artificial intelligence and bird identification

Sharpen Your Skills and Help Train Merlin™.

A project of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, this site shows you a bird and asks you questions for identification.  By so doing, Merlin begins to “learn” what people need to know. To build Merlin, Cornell Lab needs to know how thousands of people remember and describe birds.