Nunavik Revisited

I just received a “pingback” from Great Canadian Wildlife Adventures that hosted my expedition to the tundra in 2015. Here is the link to their site, citing some of the quotes from my book, Nunavik, available through my bookstore. The tundra is all I said it was, and more.

I highly recommend any one of Great Canadian Wildlife Adventures‘ trips.

CVNP’s Soft Scenes

First Signs . . .

During my six days at Cuyahoga Valley National Park I hiked about 18 miles. Getting away helps me put aside all the “baggage” of my hometown so I can focus more on my surroundings. How we

Ice-trapped

photograph is strongly influenced by our personal histories and current states of mind, as well as the settings in which we find ourselves.

Indigo Pond

This series is one that I don’t normally shoot. But recently I’ve been influenced by a fellow photographer who shoots this way, though her work is far better. But,

Indigo Pond

temporarily released from the “bonds” of my history, I gave it a shot, several in fact. Also different, I took the first image with my Tokina 11 – 16mm lens, and the remainders with my Canon 100 – 400mm lens, instead of my usual Canon 15 – 85mm lens–I might as well be completely different.

The Inspiration of Maine’s Coast

Exploring Maine's Coast 2nd Cover (2)


I’m pleased to announce that a second printing of my photo book, Exploring Maine’s Coast: Belfast to Wells, will be available through Sherman’s Books & Stationery’s six stores in Maine. This printing includes the respective area map on the separator page introducing each of the book’s sections.

It should be on shelves shortly after Labor Day, as well as through my online bookstore.

Return to Dust

The tundra at Lake Diana
The tundra at Lake Diana

The photo, above, shows a tundra in its natural state. Although Inuit hunt and trap on these lands, there are no worn footpaths, other than those made by musk oxen and caribou. Yet, even these northern lands are changing due to global warming and the mining of natural resources. As the permafrost begins to melt, methane gas is release from the soil, adding to ever more global warming, threatening our planet.

We are nearly to the point where the only areas in the world not yet vulnerable to “development” lie in the national and state parks. We see the results of development in East Africa. The current issue of Black & White Photography has an article about Nick Brandt, an internationally known photographer who has photographed wildlife in East Africa over the past twenty-five years. His images of the animals are dramatic; his photographs of their former landscapes show how humans have destroyed both their beauty and their ecological value. His latest exhibition, Inherit the Dust, is now on display at Stockholm’s Fotografiska.

These photographs show life-size images of the animals on giant posters set up within the scene of the degraded landscape they once roamed. These photographs are giant panoramas composed of several photographs, all done with film.

This exhibition, along with the work of countless wildlife and landscape photographers around the world, begs the question, how long can we continue to develop land before the environment collapses? Taken from an ecological point of view, we humans are an invasive species, ultimately contributing to our own demise. Dinosaurs lived for two hundred million years–it took a giant meteor strike to wipe them out. Our earliest ancestors only go back about 200,000 years, how much longer can we last?

Upcoming Self-published Book Festival, featuring “Exploring Maine’s Coast”

I’m delighted to say that my book, Exploring Maine’s Coast, has been selected for the Monroe County Library’s Self-published Book Festival to be held at the main library in downtown Rochester on November 7 (11:30 – 4:30) and 8 (1:30 – 4:30). Only one out of three submissions were accepted into the festival so you should see some pretty good indie works. Stop by my table and I’ll answer any “behind the scenes” questions you might have. You can preview the book by clicking on the Blurb icon located on the left sidebar. I’ll have several copies with me that will be available at the festival price of $69.99 (regularly $81.53 though Blurb.com). For more information on this event Click here. Hope to see you, there!