Nunavik and Shrinking Bird Populations now 20% off plus free shipping of all books and photos to U.S. addresses!

If you’re interested in photobooks about the natural environment and climate change, you can preview these at my bookstoreNunavik, Exploring Maine’s Coast, and Shrinking Bird Populations contain wonderful photos examining these topics, each in their respective settings.

If you’ve searched for unique photos to grace your walls, my bookstore will show you the prices of my photos and direct you to my online gallery.

Please contact me if you have any questions!

Nunavik Revisited

I just received a “pingback” from Great Canadian Wildlife Adventures that hosted my expedition to the tundra in 2015. Here is the link to their site, citing some of the quotes from my book, Nunavik, available through my bookstore. The tundra is all I said it was, and more.

I highly recommend any one of Great Canadian Wildlife Adventures‘ trips.

Just out-Nunavik


This photo book is now available through my bookstore. Although the original intent of this trip was to photograph musk oxen, the book also tells a brief history of Nunavik’s Inuit. It was quite the experience going where relatively few people go.

If you’ve ever been to Nunavik, perhaps you would share your experience.

Forthcoming Book Announcement

Fielding_Nunavik Cover
Map: Courtesy of Nunavik Tourism

Expedition to Nunavik: A Photo Essay is a collection of photographs with a brief history of Northern Quebec (see my two posts about the trip from August 2015). It is about our relationship to the environment.

I was looking for an interesting place to photograph early in 2015, possibly Antarctica, New Zealand, or Iceland. Then, an advertisement in Outdoor Photographer Magazine placed by Nunavik Tourism of Northern Fielding_Nunavik.jpg Page 48Quebec caught my eye.

Although we were going to photograph musk oxen and landscapes, this expedition would lead me to learn more about the history and culture of Nunavik’s Inuit. Like so many native Peoples around the world, the Inuit face constant tension between maintaining their culture and traditional way of life, and integrating with the Western world.

Fielding_Nunavik.jpg Page 24I’m waiting for a decision on a proposal I submitted to a Canadian publisher. Should the press be interested, the book would likely be published in 2017. If the press decides not to publish, I will independently publish later this year. I should know which direction publication will take within the next few weeks.

 

Out on the Nunavik Tundra

As I said in my prior post, it’s just you and the members of your expedition with nature when you’re on the Tundra. It was just a wonderful experience. All my photos to this point have been taken with my smaller Fuji X100S. Once I was out on the Tundra it was time to pull out the heavy glass, up to 6 pounds of it with my Canon 100-400mm lens attached to my Canon 7D camera body. I also used a Tokina 11-16mm f / 2.8 wide angle for the Aurora and some landscape shots, and the standard Canon 15-85mm lens, also for landscapes. You can see some of my photos of the Nunavik Tundra.

Now its time to start working on the photo book that will include about 60 (not as yet seen) Tundra photos. I expect this to be completed sometime in the early part of next year. It will also contain some description of Inuit culture and how they view their land.

So, that’s it for now regarding the Tundra.  I just received an offer to photograph a performance by the SUNY Brockport Dance Company. I suspect it will be tougher to capture the dancers in my view finder than it was the musk-ox.

Stay tuned!